Birds
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Cages
Bird in cage

Proper cage selection is vital to your bird’s health. Your bird spends a large portion of time in its cage each day, so it is important to choose a cage that meets its needs. Choosing an over-sized or under-sized cage can be detrimental to both the development and behavior of your bird. A good starting point is to choose a cage that is roughly 2-3 times the width of your bird’s extended wingspan, although that rule doesn’t necessarily apply to very small or very large birds. When keeping two birds together, you need to choose a cage that is twice that size.

Bar spacing

Bar spacing is as important as cage size, large bar spacing is not suitable for smaller birds and can allow them to escape or even become caught in the cage. Small bar spacing causes problems for larger birds as smaller bars are usually thinner and more easily destroyed. Generally, cages for smaller birds have 3/8” to 1/2” bar spacing (cages for birds such as finches can have even smaller spacing). Larger birds do best with a bar spacing of ½” or more, all the way up to 1” for macaw cages.
The difference between 1" and 3/8" bar spacing is substantial

The majority of cages come with cage grates. Grates play an important role in your bird’s cage as they limit access to uneaten or spoiled food, as well as keeping your bird from walking in its own waste. Grate spacing is usually comparable to bar spacing.

Playpen top
Another optional component on some cages is a playpen top. These tops enable you to create a place for your bird to play when not confined to the cage while not taking up a lot of extra space in your house. However, it is important to remember that playpen tops are often not a good choice for large birds, as being higher than their owners can give them a feeling of dominance.

We carry a selection of cages from A&E Cage Company and Prevue-Hendryx